Category "Health"

31Mar

COVID-19 outbreaks in Saskatchewan | Globalnews.ca

by BBG Hub

Since the novel coronavirus pandemic began, the Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) had been alerting the public about businesses that have likely been exposed to COVID-19 by an infectious person.

This is done when health officials are uncertain they have identified all close contacts.

The SHA said COVID-19 alerts will now only be issued when self-isolation is immediately required.

According to SHA, these alerts will be issued based on the clinical discretion of the local medical health officer.

“(Alerts will be issued) when the following three key criteria are met: all contacts cannot be notified within 48 hours, there is a resulting increased risk to the public, and the direction is needed for public members in attendance to immediately self-isolate as a result of this increased risk,” the SHA said.

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Here is a list of all the active COVID-19 outbreaks in the province.

Outbreaks

Ahtahkakoop

Feb. 27, 2021: Ahtahkakoop — community outbreak

Allan

Feb. 17, 2021: Nutrien Mine — workplace

Balcarres

Nov. 22, 2020: Senior Balcarres Broncos Hockey — sports team

Birch Hills

March 12, 2021: Capstone Condominiums — retirement home

Carrot River

March 22, 2021: Dunkley Lumber – Edgewood Forest Products — workplace

March 17, 2021: Nutrien — workplace

Emerald Park

March 27, 2021: Prairie Harley-Davidson — workplace

March 7, 2021: Boston Pizza — restaurant

Esterhazy

Feb. 25, 2021: Industrial Scaffold Services, Mosaic K1 Mine Site — workplace

Feb. 10, 2021: Supreme Steel  ( K3 Mine Site Esterhazy) — workplace

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Feb. 10, 2021: Brock Canada Inc., Mosaic K1 Mill Site — workplace

Estevan

March 26, 2021: Western Financial Group Inc. — workplace

March 18, 2021: Sun Country Well Servicing — workplace

Fort Qu’Appelle

March 16, 2021: All Nations Healing Hospital — health facility

Glaslyn

Feb. 28, 2021: JO Glaslyn Daycare — daycare

La Loche

Jan. 19, 2021: La Loche Homeless Shelter — homeless shelter

La Ronge

Feb. 2, 2021: La Ronge Co-operative Marketplace — workplace

Leroy

March 12, 2021: Leroy Town Office & RM — workplace

Lloydminster

March 18, 2021: Orion Dental Group — workplace

March 17, 2021: Koi Etc. — store

March 14, 2021: Guest Control Systems — workplace

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March 11, 2021: Stuart Wright Ltd. — workplace

March 8, 2021: Bea Fisher Ability Development Services (Alberta Home #5) — group home

March 7, 2021: Play & Learn Daycare — child care facility

Marshall

March 26, 2021: Richardson Pioneer — workplace

Martensville

NEW March 30, 2021: Automated Metal Processing Ltd. — workplace

March 28, 2021: We Care Day Care — child care facility

March 28, 2021: Richardson Milling — workplace

March 8, 2021: Fehr Home Daycare — child care facility

Feb. 12, 2021: Nienhuis Contracting — workplace

Meadow Lake

March 4, 2021: Extra Foods — workplace

March 3, 2021: McDonald’s — workplace

March 1, 2021: KFC — workplace

Feb. 26, 2021: Nor’Wester Motor Inn (Bar & Restaurant) — workplace

Feb. 25, 2021: Extra Foods — workplace

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Feb. 25, 2021: Tolko (OSB Mill) — workplace

Feb. 24, 2021: A&W — workplace

Feb. 21, 2021: Home Hardware — workplace

Mistawasis First Nation

March 20, 2021: Mistawasis First Nation — Community Outbreak

Moose Jaw

NEW March 30, 2021: Main Street Strength and Conditioning — workplace

March 21, 2021: Cornerstone Christian School — school

Feb. 20, 2021: Victoria Towers — retirement home

North Battleford

March 22, 2021: O’Neills Classic Carpentry — workplace

March 14, 2021: The Hitching Post Motel — motel

Northgate

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March 26, 2021: Ceres Global Northgate Terminal — workplace

Osler

March 4, 2021: Creative Wood Interiors — workplace

March 2, 2021: Town Office — workplace

Oxbow

March 26, 2021: Oxbow Prairie Horizon School — school

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Pelican Lake

March 25, 2021: Pelican Lake Group Home — group home

Piapot

Feb. 7, 2021: Piapot — community outbreak

Pinehouse

Jan. 16, 2021: Judille’s Place Senior’s Complex — communal living setting

Jan. 1, 2021: Pinehouse — community outbreak

Regina

March 29, 2021: Taco Time (3881 Rochdale Blvd.) — restaurant

March 29, 2021: Regina Motor Products — workplace

March 29, 2021: H & R Block (346 McCarthy Blvd.) — workplace

March 29, 2021: Think Pink Nails — workplace

March 29, 2021: The Stripe Shop — workplace

March 29, 2021: Greg Grill Contracting — workplace

March 29, 2021: Alpine Drywall — workplace

March 28, 2021: William Booth Special Care Home (Regina Wascana Grace Hospice) — special care home

March 28, 2021: Master Feeds/Cowtown — workplace

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March 27, 2021: Bianca Amor’s Liquidation Supercentre — workplace

March 27, 2021: Brandt Tractor — workplace

March 27, 2021: Regina Eastview Daycare — child care

March 27, 2021: Heritage Kids Daycare — child care

March 27, 2021: Avena Foods Limited — workplace

March 27, 2021: Hampton Inn — workplace

March 27, 2021: Office Renovation Project Worksite — workplace

March 27, 2021: Leopold’s Tavern (address not provided) — restaurant

March 27, 2021: Minhas Sask Ventures Inc. — workplace

March 27, 2021: Cre8tive Designs Nail and Spa — workplace

March 27, 2021: Prairie Skies Medical Imaging  — workplace

March 26, 2021: École Harbour Landing School — school

March 25, 2021: Evolution Fitness (358 McCarthy Blvd. N.) — gym

March 25, 2021: Downtown Automatic Transmission — workplace

March 24, 2021: Subway (4738 Gordon Rd.) — restaurant

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March 24, 2021: Wascana Rehabilitation Centre (Mental Health Unit) — special care home

March 24, 2021: Canada Post – Maintenance Department (2200 Saskatchewan Dr.) — workplace

March 24, 2021: Darla Okafor Daycare (625 College Ave.) — child care

March 24, 2021: McKenna Distribution — workplace

March 23, 2021: Sport Clips (4617 Gordon Rd.) — workplace

March 23, 2021: A1 Choice Carpet Cleaning and Janitorial — workplace

March 23, 2021: Chip and Dale Homes — workplace

March 22, 2021: Luther College High School — school

March 22, 2021: Marion McVeety Elementary School — school

March 22, 2021: G and K Day Care (98 Paynter Cres.) — child care

March 22, 2021: McDonald’s (1955 Prince of Wales Dr.) — restaurant

March 22, 2021: Bank of Montreal (3891 Rochdale Blvd.) — workplace

March 22, 2021: Anglican Church of the Redeemer — place of worship

March 22, 2021: Serbian Club — workplace

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March 22, 2021: Finning Canada (2360 Pasqua St. N.) — workplace

March 20, 2021: Pink Rose Nails & Spa (639 Victoria Ave.) — workplace

March 20, 2021: Safeway (2931 13th Ave.) — workplace

March 20, 2021: Shoppers Drug Mart (2028 Park St.) —  workplace

March 20, 2021: Kal Tire (635 University Park Dr.) —  workplace

March 20, 2021: École St. Elizabeth — school

March 20, 2021: St. Gabriel School — school

March 20, 2021: École Du Parc — school

March 19, 2021: Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School —  school

March 19, 2021: Waultten Mechanical Ltd., Susum Road, RM of Sherwood — workplace

March 19, 2021: CN North Regina Yard (1st Avenue North) — workplace

March 19, 2021: Faith Group Home — group home

March 19, 2021: Dr. A.E. Perry School — school

March 19, 2021: Ryko Telecommunications — workplace

March 18, 2021: Grace Within — personal care home

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March 17, 2021: Milu Fresh Rolls & V-Subs (2065 Prince of Wales Dr.) — workplace

March 17, 2021: Scotiabank (2907 13th Ave.) — workplace

March 16, 2021: Extendicare (Sunset) — special care home

March 15, 2021: Allure Nail Bar and Spa — workplace

March 15, 2021: City of Regina Fire & Protective Services – Fire Station #7 (Platoon #4) — workplace

March 14, 2021: Ranch Ehrlo Society — workplace

March 12, 2021: M.J. Caldwell School — school

March 12, 2021: Clean Brite Ltd. 1037 Winnipeg St. — workplace

March 9, 2021: K-Bro Linen Systems — workplace

March 9, 2021: Weston Foods (1310 Ottawa St.) — workplace

March 9, 2021: Rahmah Centre — place of worship

March 9, 2021: Extendicare (Elmview) — long-term care home

March 7, 2021: Continental Engine Rebuilders Ltd — workplace

March 7, 2021: The Cottage Restaurant — restaurant

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March 5, 2021: Regina Discount Bar — workplace

Feb. 24, 2021: Caraway Grill (1625 Broad St.) — workplace

Feb. 18, 2021: Starbucks Grasslands, 4519 Gordon Rd. — workplace

Feb. 18, 2021: YMCA Harbour Landing Childcare — child care

Feb. 8, 2021: Hope’s Home Rosewood — group home

Feb. 7, 2021: Loblaw – Regina Distribution Centre — workplace

Dec. 9, 2020: Regina Provincial Correctional Centre — correctional centre

Nov. 25, 2020: Regina Provincial Correctional Centre (Isolation Unit) — correctional centre

Rocanville

March 7, 2021: DMS Industrial Construction (Nutrien Potash Mine – Mill 1 Refurbishment Project) — workplace

Rosthern

March 27, 2021: Valley Action Abilities Home — group home

Dec. 9, 2020: Mennonite Nursing Home — special care home

Saskatoon

March 29, 2021: Dodge City Auto — workplace

March 29, 2021: Crestline Coach — workplace

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March 27, 2021: Wild Spirit Education — school

March 27, 2021: Centre Éducatif Félix Le Chat — child care

March 25, 2021: Wright Construction (Head Office) — workplace

March 23, 2021: Hub City Iron & Metal — workplace

March 20, 2021: Willowgrove School — school

March 18, 2021: Case New Holland Industrial — workplace

March 18, 2021: CNH Industrial (1000 71 St. E.) — workplace

March 18, 2021: The Associates (Ron Baliski Realty) — workplace

March 16, 2021: Sheraton Cavalier — workplace

March 16, 2021: The James Hotel — workplace

March 15, 2021: Monkey Junction Day Home — child care facility

March 14, 2021: Lawson Heights School — school

March 12, 2021: Saskatoon Police Services Break and Enter Unit — workplace

March 10, 2021: Odla — restaurant

March 10, 2021: Evergreen Early Learning Centre — child care facility

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March 8, 2021: Primrose Chateau — retirement home

March 8, 2021: May Nails & Spa — workplace

March 4, 2021: Green Line Manufacturing Ltd. — workplace

Feb. 27, 2021: City of Saskatoon Waste and Water Maintenance — workplace

Feb. 27, 2021: Montana’s BBQ & Bar (1840 McOrmand Dr.) — restaurant

Feb. 24, 2021: Nutrien Ag Solutions (81 Yellowhead Hwy) — workplace

Feb. 19, 2021: Prairie Pride Natural Foods — workplace

Jan. 27, 2021: ServiceMaster Restore — workplace

Jan. 25, 2021: Private Day Home on Laval — daycare

Jan. 7, 2021: Aquifer Distribution Ltd. — workplace

Dec. 21, 2020: Saskatoon Police Service (Platoon Patrol Level A & Tactical Unit 1) — workplace

Dec. 11, 2020: Idylwyld Centre — workplace

Standing Buffalo

Feb. 12, 2021: Lakeview Lodge — personal care home

Tobin Lake

March 10, 2021: The Shorebird Inn — workplace

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Waldheim

NEW March 29, 2021: Private Day Home — daycare

March 22, 2021: Waldheim School — school

Warman

Feb. 22, 2021: Neu-Care — personal care home

Watrous

Feb. 28, 2021: Quality Plus Construction and associated contractors (Specified Worksite) — workplace

Feb. 26, 2021: The Basement Spin Studio — workplace

Feb. 25, 2021: Coop Food Store — workplace

Weyburn

March 26, 2021: Souris School

Wynyard

March 11, 2021: CP Railyard — workplace

Yorkton

March 23, 2021: Yorkton Regional Health Centre (Unit 2 South) — hospital

March 14, 2021: Dr. Brass School (Kindergarten) — school

Feb. 20, 2021: Kahkewistahaw Gas and Convenience Store — workplace

Feb. 8, 2021: Yorkton District Nursing Home – Skinner Unit — special care home

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Jan. 19, 2021: Yorkton Regional Health Centre (1st East and West Units) — hospital

Zagime Anishinabek (Sakimay)

March 16, 2021: First Nation Band Office — workplace

 


Click to play video: 'COVID Alert app now available in Saskatchewan'







COVID Alert app now available in Saskatchewan


COVID Alert app now available in Saskatchewan – Sep 18, 2020





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16Mar

Nova Scotia to spend $700,000 to equip all public schools with defibrillators – Halifax

by BBG Hub

Nova Scotia is spending $700,000 to equip all the province’s public schools with automated external defibrillators.

Education Minister Derek Mombourquette said today in a news release schools are often used by people of all ages during evenings and weekends and having the devices available could save someone’s life.

Read more:
Halifax woman runs defibrillator to a patient in need, with help from registry

The province is purchasing 350 of the portable electronic devices, which analyze the heart’s rhythm and deliver an electric shock to help it return to a more effective rhythm.

The Education Department says about 70 schools already have defibrillators.


Click to play video: 'Campaign underway to raise awareness of automated external defibrillators'







Campaign underway to raise awareness of automated external defibrillators


Campaign underway to raise awareness of automated external defibrillators – May 30, 2018

Once installed, the defibrillators will be added to a database run by Emergency Health Services, which allows the department to direct people who call 911 to the closest machine.

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The department says automated external defibrillators cost about $2,000, and that there are more than 1,300 of the devices registered in the province.




© 2021 The Canadian Press





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10Mar

How the COVID-19 pandemic left lifelong scars on the global job market – National

by BBG Hub

Esther Montanez’s housecleaning job at the Hilton Back Bay in Boston was a lifeline for her, a 31-year-old single mother with a 5-year-old son.

The pay was steady and solid — enough to pay her bills and still have money left over to sock away for a savings account for her child. Montanez liked her co-workers and felt pride in her work.

But when the viral pandemic slammed violently into the U.S. economy a year ago, igniting a devastating recession, it swept away her job, along with many tens of millions of others. Since then, in desperation, Montanez has siphoned away money from her son’s savings to help meet expenses. At Christmas, she turned to charities to provide presents for him. For now, she’s getting by on unemployment aid and, for the first time, has applied for food stamps.

Read more:
People who lost jobs in 2020 had wages below Canadian average, report says

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“The truth is, I want my job back,” said Montanez, who has banded with her former colleagues and worked through their union to press the hotel to reinstate their jobs.

Getting it back could prove a struggle for her, along with millions of other unemployed people around the world. Even as viral vaccines increasingly promise a return to something close to normal life, the coronavirus seems sure to leave permanent scars on the job market. At least 30% of the U.S. jobs lost to the pandemic aren’t expected to come back — a sizable proportion of them at employers that require face-to-face contact with consumers: Hotels, restaurants, retailers, entertainment venues.

The threat to workers in those occupations, many of them low-wage earners, marks a sharp reversal from the 2008-2009 Great Recession, when middle- and higher-wage construction, factory, office and financial services workers bore the brunt of job losses.

No one knows exactly what the job market will look like when the virus finally ends its rampage.


Click to play video 'Suncor Energy says it will cut 10 to 15 per cent of its workforce over next 18 months'







Suncor Energy says it will cut 10 to 15 per cent of its workforce over next 18 months


Suncor Energy says it will cut 10 to 15 per cent of its workforce over next 18 months – Oct 2, 2020

Will consumers feel confident enough to return in significant numbers to restaurants, bars, movie theaters and shops, allowing those decimated businesses to employ as many people as they did before?

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How much will white-collar professionals continue to work from home, leaving downtown business districts all but empty during the week?

Will business travel fully rebound now that companies have seen the ease with which co-workers can collaborate on video platforms at far less cost?

“Jobs are changing — industries are changing,” said Loretta Penn, chair of the Virginia Ready Initiative, which helps workers develop new skills and find new jobs. “We’re creating a new normal every day.’’

The habits that people have grown accustomed to in the pandemic — working, shopping, eating and enjoying entertainment from home — could prove permanent for many. Though these trends predated the virus, the pandemic accelerated them. Depending on how widely such habits stick, demand for waiters, cashiers, front-desk clerks and ticket takers may never regain its previous highs.

The consultancy McKinsey & Co. estimates that the United States will lose 4.3 million jobs in customer and food service in the next decade.

In a study, José María Barrero of Mexico’s ITAM Business School, Nick Bloom of Stanford University and Steven Davis of the University of Chicago concluded that 32% to 42% of COVID-induced layoffs will be permanent.

The U.S. Labor Department, too, has tried to estimate the pandemic’s likely impact on the job market. Before taking the pandemic into account, the department last year projected that U.S. jobs would grow 3.7% between 2019 and 2019.

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Last month, it estimated that if the outbreak’s lasting economic effects were limited mainly to increased work from home, job growth over the 10 years would slow to 2.9%.

But if the pandemic exerts a deeper, longer-lasting impact — with many consumers going less frequently to restaurants, movie theaters and shopping centers — job growth would slow to just 1.9%, the department predicted. In that worst-case scenario, the department estimated, employment would tumble 13% for waiters and waitresses, 14% for bartenders, 16% for fast food cooks and 22% for hotel desk clerks.

Read more:
Canadians remain concerned about health of job market amid pandemic: survey

The coronavirus recession has been especially cruel, victimizing people at the bottom of the pay scale. Lael Brainard, one of the Federal Reserve’s governors, said last month that the poorest 25% of American workers were facing “Depression-era rates of unemployment of around 23%” in mid-January — nearly quadruple the national jobless rate.

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The Fed also reported last month that employment in the lowest-paid jobs was running 20% below pre-pandemic levels. For the highest-paying jobs, by contrast, the shortfall was just 5%.

Services workers had long been thought to be safe from the threats that menaced factory employment: Foreign competition and automation. But more and more, as employers have sought to save money in a time of uncertainty and to promote social distancing in the workplace, machines are reaching beyond the factory floor and into retail, restaurants and hotels.

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Tamura Jamison, for instance, came back to a changed job when she was recalled to work in June as a front desk agent at the Paris Las Vegas Hotel & Casino, owned by Caesars Entertainment. Her hours were cut from 40 to about 32 a week, resulting in a pay cut of about $700 a month.

Just 26 of 45 workers on her team were brought back. Existing self-service kiosks used to be optional for guests checking in. No longer, Now, agents must direct guests to the kiosks and intervene only if needed. That means fewer commissions for room upgrades; guests can request them on their own.

As a union shop steward, Jamison knows that her missing colleagues won’t likely be recalled.

“At this point,” she said, “they have to move on with their lives.”

Jamison wonders whether the front desk operation will eventually be eliminated altogether, the jobs lost to automation. Guests, she notes, will soon have keys on their smartphones, allowing them to go directly to their rooms.

“This is the start of a new Vegas,” Jamison said. “The front desk doesn’t really have to be there. There are ways to eliminate our jobs.”


Click to play video 'COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on Quebec job market'







COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on Quebec job market


COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on Quebec job market – Aug 11, 2020

In a study out last month, Stefania Albanesi of the University of Pittsburgh and Jiyeon Kim of the Korea Development Institute warned that in a world still fearful of the virus or of other health threats, many companies could replace employees with machines rather than redesign workspaces to facilitate social distancing and reduce the threat of infection.

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The services occupations that have absorbed the biggest job losses, they say, “have high susceptibility to automation.” That “raises the prospect that as the economy recovers, at least some of the jobs lost may not be reinstated.’’

Few places have been hurt more ruinously by the pandemic than Las Vegas, whose economy is powered by out-of-town visitors and live entertainment. Until 12 months ago, Sharon Beza was among 283,000 workers in the city’s tourism and hospitality field. She had worked as a cocktail waitress at Eastside Cannery hotel-casino from the time it opened in 2008 to the day she was furloughed a year ago. Over the summer, her job was eliminated.

Now a part-time cashier at an Albertsons grocery store, Beza is still seeking full-time work in the restaurant industry, which employed her for 37 years. She’s holding out hope that Las Vegas will rebound and tourists will return to restaurants, hotels and casinos. But it may be impossible, she knows, for laid-off workers like her to land jobs that offer the kinds of solid wages, tips and benefits they used to enjoy.

In Europe, government jobs programs have prevented a devastating spike in unemployment. Unemployment in January was 8.1%, up only modestly from 7.4% a year earlier. Yet an economic reckoning has begun, with companies in the worst-hit sectors envisioning years of reduced demand.

Consider commercial airlines. Lufthansa’s workforce shrank from 138,000 to 110,000 in 2020. British Airways plans to cut 12,000 jobs from its 42,000-strong workforce. UK-based regional airline Flybe took 2,000 jobs with it when it collapsed a year ago.

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Germany’s hotel and restaurant association says that despite government support to help maintain payrolls, employment sank from 2.45 million pre-pandemic to 2.09 million. Holger Schaefer, a labor economist at the German Economic Institute in Cologne, suggested that behavioral changes — more digital meetings, for example, and less business travel — would result in permanent job losses in some companies.

By contrast, some other sectors of the economy should benefit from pent-up demand once the virus is defeated. Schaefer is optimistic about restaurants, for one.

“There is a fundamental demand for such services,” he said. “I can’t imagine that when everyone is vaccinated and it’s safe, that there will still be problems in that area.”

Around the world in the Chinese city of Xuzhou, northwest of Shanghai, Guan Li, a convenience store owner, said he hired four out-of-work relatives but had to lay them off after sales fell by half. Now, he and his wife run the shop themselves.

“People just don’t want to buy,” he said. Guan, who is close to 60, and his wife plan to retire because the shop’s income may no longer cover their costs. Owners of two similar shops nearby also plan to close, he said.

In Egypt, Mohammed Gamal used to earn a decent living working six days a week at a café in Giza, twin city of Cairo. But pandemic restrictions and dwindling business shrank his workweek and slashed his income by more than half. It didn’t help when the government banned “sheesha,” the hookah water pipe that’s popular across the Middle East and is a major moneymaker for cafes.

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In mid-2020, he sent his wife and two children back to his parents’ house in Beni Mazar, south of Cairo. Now, he shares a room with a friend to save on rent.

“I just work three days a week, and this is not enough even for a single person,” said Gamal, 31.

In Mexico City, Gerardo González, wearing a suit, a black mask and a plastic face shield, waited recently on the sidewalk outside the delivery service Didi. He had hoped to find work a month after he lost his job at a bakery where he did cleaning and displayed merchandise,

He’s applied for jobs at five companies.

“I can’t get anything,” said González, 51, who supports his wife and two young children. To meet his family’s expenses, he’s burned through his savings.

“We hope that with the vaccine, things will start going back to normal,” he said.

Melinda Harmon lost a job she loved as a bartender at Milwaukee’s Fiserv Forum last year. First, she found work as a health care aide for $9.25 an hour. Even after receiving a raise to $10, she struggled to support her two sons. Frustrated, she resigned and took on a new job as a security guard for $12 an hour. She’s been switching off lights to save money for electricity and has had to delay haircuts for her two beloved Pomeranians.

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Click to play video 'WestJet executive calls for federal support after company slashed flights and jobs'







WestJet executive calls for federal support after company slashed flights and jobs


WestJet executive calls for federal support after company slashed flights and jobs – Oct 14, 2020

Yet she remains optimistic that the Fiserv Forum will reopen and that she will one day be mixing drinks for Bucks fans again.

“I do believe things will go back,” said Harmon, 39.

In New York, Bill Zanker is also envisioning a comeback after being forced to close his luxury gym, Grit Bxng. He’s raising money to launch an at-home fitness business in the fall, which will mean eventually hiring to support a online business, including customer service and supply specialists.

Still, Zanker is hopeful that his Manhattan gym, known for its cocktail bar and backed by billionaire Tony Robbins and others, will eventually come roaring back. Before the pandemic forced its closure, Zanker said, classes would be booked for the entire week within two hours each Monday morning. With the bar typically packed, he had been on the verge of opening a second location.

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“There is so much pent-up demand,” Zanker said. “People after class are going to want to hang out and socialize. It’s like after Prohibition: Party like there’s no tomorrow.”

However things shake out, the pandemic disruption to the job market will likely require millions of workers to find new careers. Reviewing the job outlook in eight major economies, McKinsey estimated that 100 million workers — 1 in 16 — will need to change occupations by 2030. In the United States, McKinsey concluded, workers who will need retraining are most likely to have a lost low-income job and to be Black, Hispanic or female.

Read more:
COVID-19 pandemic hammers job market, but there are ‘opportunities,’ say analysts

“You can take people in these unskilled positions and teach them,” said Susan Lund, an author of the consultancy’s report on the jobs of the future. But in the United States, she said, “the problem is, we have not scaled it up. We do not a have a national program to do it.’’

The U.S. spends a fraction of what other rich countries do on programs that are designed to help workers make career transitions. And a bewildering web of employment and training programs often leaves workers confused. The programs tend to focus on helping laid-off factory workers — not the unemployed chefs and sales clerks who are likely to be most in need in the pandemic’s aftermath.

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“We make people jump through insane hoops just to get advice on getting a new job,” said Annelies Goger, who studies training programs as a fellow at the Brookings Institution. “We make it extremely challenging.’

In a paper last year, David Autor and Elisabeth Reynolds of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology warned that dwindling demand for low-paid workers without college degrees won’t coincide with job opportunities for “these same workers in middle-paid jobs…

“Those displaced may suffer significant hardship as they seek new work, potentially in occupations where they have no experience or training,” they wrote.

Wiseman reported from Washington, Olson from New York. AP writers David McHugh in Frankfurt, Germany; Frances D’Emilio and Maria Grazia Murru in Rome; Joe McDonald and Yu Bing in Beijing; Zen Soo in Hong Kong; Chen Si in Shanghai; Sam Magdy in Cairo; Sam Metz in Carson City, Nevada; and Fabiola Sánchez in Mexico City also contributed to this report.





© 2021 The Canadian Press




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26Feb

N.B. Coalition for Seniors rep has ‘mixed feelings’ about new nursing home announcement – New Brunswick

by BBG Hub

Following comments from the Auditor General on the crisis in the nursing home sector, New Brunswick has launched a request for proposals for a new nursing home to begin construction this year.

In a news release on Thursday, the province said its Social Development Department is calling for proposals for a 60-bed nursing home in the Acadian Peninsula, in northeast New Brunswick.

“This government is committed to providing the right kind of care at the right time,” said Social Development Minister Bruce Fitch in the release.

“The development of this project is a priority to address the need for nursing home beds in the area.”

Read more:
New Brunswick’s auditor general warns of crisis in nursing home sector

New Brunswick’s auditor general warned Wednesday of a crisis in the nursing home sector if the government doesn’t address the shortage of spaces.

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Kim Adair-MacPherson said the number of seniors in the province is expected to double by 2036 and there are currently almost 800 seniors waiting for a nursing home placement.

The AG report also found that millions of dollars are spent on additional costs related to New Brunswickers waiting for nursing home beds.


Click to play video 'Long-term care sector welcomes new legislation keeping couples together in homes'







Long-term care sector welcomes new legislation keeping couples together in homes


Long-term care sector welcomes new legislation keeping couples together in homes – Feb 5, 2021

Cecile Cassista, director of the New Brunswick Coalition for Seniors, says the AG report could have been a factor in rolling out Thursday’s announcement.

But Cassista isn’t confident that a new nursing home is the only necessary step towards a solution. She says she is concerned that the province is proposing a new nursing home without addressing staffing issues.

“We have staffing problems today, and we are asking the government to not have the staff currently working in these facilities working in multiple locations,” Cassista said.

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“Unless they put more resources in it, they’re going to continue to have a crisis.”

Global News has reached out to the Social Development Department but has not received a response by the time of publication.


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N.B. auditor general highlights lack of public accountability in new audit


N.B. auditor general highlights lack of public accountability in new audit

In Thursday’s release, Fitch said the new nursing home is a part of Phase 2 of the province’s five-year Nursing Home Plan that began in 2018.

The release said the plan “has the objective to address two primary issues: aging infrastructure and the need for additional beds.” The plan includes the implementation of 600 “Level 3” nursing homes around the province.

“The Nursing Home Plan was developed following an in-depth assessment of a demographic projection review, current nursing home facility condition assessments, and a review of design standards for new nursing homes,” said Fitch in the release.

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The province said there are currently 70 licensed nursing homes with a total of 4,925 beds.

According to the release, construction of the new nursing home in the Acadian Peninsula could begin this fall and open doors in 2023.

Read more:
New Brunswick long-term care homes short staffed during COVID-19

In terms of Thursday’s announcement, Cassista said 60 beds is big enough for a nursing home — “any bigger than that… the seniors are really disconnected.”

She said smaller homes are always preferable.

“We can’t be warehousing our seniors, and that’s what governments of today seem to do, and that’s really not acceptable.”

While the need for beds is a reality in New Brunswick, Cassista said she hopes to see the province invest more into letting seniors age in their own homes.

“I always get concerned when they start building nursing homes and they don’t address the home-care piece.”

Cassista said seniors want to stay at home, but more funding for home-care is needed.

While she said she has mixed feelings about the call for proposals for a new nursing home, she hopes more action is taken in a way that benefits seniors.

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“I’d really like to see the government deal with the issues of the auditor general’s recommendations. She’s concerned, and we’re concerned.”




© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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26Jan

COVID-19: Hinshaw says Alberta’s health system making significant progress on contact tracing capacity

by BBG Hub

Alberta’s contact-tracing system became overwhelmed late last year when the number of COVID-19  cases began to surge, but the province’s chief medical officer of health says the system’s capacity to do the job has grown considerably since then.

At a news conference in Edmonton on Tuesday, Dr. Deena Hinshaw said that while Alberta Health Services is still hiring more contact tracers, the health authority has “enough capacity in their teams to call all cases within 24 hours of that case being identified in the lab.”

The ability to make those calls within 24 hours appeared to be a major step forward from just two weeks ago, when Hinshaw said the contact-tracing system had improved to the point of being able to make calls “within 24 hours to all high-priority cases of COVID-19.”

READ MORE: Alberta’s contact tracing improving: Hinshaw 

Hinshaw suggested that the contact-tracing efforts have been even more successful lately than numbers would suggest, as the province’s daily numbers showing cases with unknown sources sometimes appears higher than it actually is because of a lag caused by time needed for data entry.

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“So there will always be a proportion of unknowns that show up… on the dashboard,” she said. “It’s also important to remember that because COVID-19 can incubate for up to 14 days, it is sometimes difficult (or) sometimes not possible to identify the source of a particular case, and in those cases, even after that interview has been completed… sometimes despite the best efforts of the individual and that case investigator, it’s not possible to determine where the source was.

“Our next step to is to try to move down to a little more granular data to understand the types of activities where the exposure is happening.”

AHS has had a goal of having 2,000 contact tracers in place and doing the job by February. On Tuesday, the health authority told Global News it had about 1,800 contact tracers in place as of Friday.

“AHS continues to hire and train additional contact tracers,” the health authority said. “Approximately 500 staff completed orientation during the weeks of Jan. 15 and Jan. 22.”

Update on COVID-19 variants in Alberta

Hinshaw said the improvements in the contact-tracing system will be crucial in responding to any potential community transmission of COVID-19 variants in Alberta.

“The benefit we have is the robust work that’s happened to expand our contact-tracing teams,” she said, saying teams can now be quickly be deployed in the event there is a possible case of community transmission of one of the COVID-19 variants.

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“We would be using the teams we have at our disposal — local health professionals, local medical officers of health and those contact-tracing teams — to be able to move very quickly when we see some of those indications.”

Hinshaw noted those teams would then engage in both forward and backward tracing if they are not sure about a source and also initiate aggressive testing protocols to learn more information about potential spread.

“It’s an enhanced version of what we typically do with all COVID(-19) cases but with greater focus and making sure that… we’re very deliberate about that additional testing and focusing on those who have come in contact with those cases.”

On Monday, Health Minister Tyler Shandro announced that while an investigation has yet to make a final determination, it appears possible that there may have been community transmission in Alberta of a COVID-19 variant first identified in the U.K.

READ MORE: U.K. variant of COVID-19 ‘may have entered the broader community’ in Alberta: Shandro 

“With respect to the first case, there has been a limited amount of household transmission at this point,” Hinshaw said Tuesday. “At this point we don’t have any evidence that it’s spread further beyond the household. We don’t, at this point, have a known travel link but we do continue to investigate.”

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As of Monday, Alberta had identified 20 cases of the variant first identified in the U.K. and five cases of the variant first identified in South Africa.

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While the province is currently only providing weekly updates on cases involving COVID-19 variants in Alberta, Hinshaw said health officials “will be looking into the needs of Albertans as we go forward” when asked why the updates weren’t being made available daily.

Hinshaw said that while much of the data her team reports on COVID-19 cases is done with the help of automation, “reporting on variant strains is being done manually and a more labour-intensive process.”

“(We) are continually looking to improve,” she said.

Latest COVID-19 numbers in Alberta

Hinshaw said there have been 14 more deaths in Alberta that were linked to COVID-19.

She offered her condolences to the families who have lost loved ones and acknowledged that “this pandemic and the current restrictions make it harder to grieve.”

Seven deaths were recorded in the Edmonton zone. According to Alberta Health, all cases were linked to outbreaks and all included known comorbidities.

Three deaths were linked to the outbreak at Devonshire Care Centre: a man in his 100s, a woman in her 80s and a man in his 80s.

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Elsewhere in the Edmonton zone, a man in his 90s linked to the outbreak at Summerwood Village Retirement Residence, a woman in her 60s who was linked to the Lifestyle Options Schonsee outbreak, a man in his 60s linked to the outbreak at Grand Manor and a woman in her 80s who was linked to the outbreak at Lewis Estates Retirement Residence have died.

There were a total of five deaths reported from the Calgary zone. Of those, three were linked to outbreaks in the region. All three of those cases included known comorbidities.

Two of the deaths were linked to the outbreak at Carewest Colonel Belcher: a man in his 70s and a man in his 90s.

A woman in her 80s who was linked to the AgeCare Sagewood outbreak has also died.

Elsewhere in the Calgary zone, a man and a woman in their 70s have also died. According to Alberta Health, the woman’s case included comorbidities while it’s unknown whether the man had any.

Two deaths were reported in the North zone. A man in his 60s with unknown comorbidities and a woman in her 60s with known comorbidities have both died.

Hinshaw said the province identified 366 new COVID-19 cases over the past 24 hours. In that same time frame, 8,652 coronavirus tests were administered in Alberta. The province’s test positivity rate was at 4.4 per cent as of Tuesday afternoon, she noted.

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As of Tuesday afternoon, 626 people were in hospital with COVID-19 in Alberta with 108 in intensive care units.


Click to play video '366 COVID-19 cases identified Tuesday in Alberta, 14 more deaths linked to disease'







366 COVID-19 cases identified Tuesday in Alberta, 14 more deaths linked to disease


366 COVID-19 cases identified Tuesday in Alberta, 14 more deaths linked to disease

Hinshaw address abuse hurled at health professionals, misinformation spreading about COVID-19

Hinshaw was asked Tuesday about demonstrators recently showing up to the home of Saskatchewan’s chief medical officer of health to protest public health measures being taken to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

READ MORE: Protest at Saqib Shahab’s home denounced by Saskatchewan Medical Association 

“I heard the report of what happened at my colleague’s house, and it’s very disappointing to see,” she said. As a public health professional and in my role as a servant to the public, I have heard for many months many different opinions from Albertans — some have expressed those opinions in very respectful ways even when they have disagreed and I really appreciate that, because that is the most productive form of dialogue.

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“Others have been less respectful and again, that’s not the most productive way of expressing concerns. So what I would encourage all Albertans (to do) as they’re thinking about the current framework, is to recognize the best way forward is to consider how we can further that productive and respectful dialogue.”


Click to play video '‘COVID is the enemy, not one another’: Hinshaw has received reports of ‘abuse’ towards health officials'







‘COVID is the enemy, not one another’: Hinshaw has received reports of ‘abuse’ towards health officials


‘COVID is the enemy, not one another’: Hinshaw has received reports of ‘abuse’ towards health officials

Hinshaw said while she knows many Albertans are growing tired of public health restrictions and many businesses are struggling to get by during the health crisis, there would be “dire consequences” if restrictions were lifted too early.

“I wish it were not necessary,” she said. “But we must be cautious.”


Click to play video 'Alberta continues to assess COVID-19 health measures'







Alberta continues to assess COVID-19 health measures


Alberta continues to assess COVID-19 health measures

She added that she has heard of recent instances where health-care workers have been “mistreated, verbally abused or treated disrespectfully while carrying out their duties.”

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“Harassment is never OK,” Hinshaw sad. “(We) need to remember that COVID(-19) is the enemy, not one another.”

Hinshaw also urged Albertans to be careful in assessing information about COVID-19 that they come across online before believing it or sharing it further.

READ MORE: New social media campaign targets COVID-19 misinformation with science 

“It can be overwhelming to wade through all the data, stories and opinions out there,” she said, adding that the body of research surrounding the novel coronavirus continues to grow at a rapid pace and sometimes information that may have been relevant months ago may be less relevant or accurate now.

Hinshaw encouraged people to consider the source of their COVID-19 information and to seek out content provided by or promoted by health experts.

–With files from Global News’ Julia Wong and 630 CHED’s Kirby Bourne


Click to play video 'Hinshaw urges people to verify information they share on COVID-19'







Hinshaw urges people to verify information they share on COVID-19


Hinshaw urges people to verify information they share on COVID-19

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With a file from The Canadian Press.





© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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22Jan

Province invests $2 million in Beamsville hand hygiene production facility – Hamilton

by BBG Hub

The Ontario government is investing $2 million in the local production of soap and sanitizer dispensers.

The province says the funding will help OPHARDT Hygiene Technologies expand its facility in Beamsville as it increases production to 300,000 dispensers and one million dispenser drive modules per year.

Read more:
Dillon’s distillery of Beamsville making hand sanitizer and disinfectant amid coronavirus pandemic

OPHARDT is investing $7 million in the expansion, which includes purchasing molding, automation and bottle-making equipment, and is expected to create 75 new jobs and retain 96 others.

Vic Fedeli, Ontario’s minister of economic development, job creation and trade, says it’s another example of “made-in-Ontario solutions” in the fight against COVID-19.

The dispensers are destined for high-traffic areas, including airports, shopping malls and medical facilities.

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Read more:
How to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and other infections at Ontario’s long-term care homes

Ken Friesen, general manager of OPHARDT Hygiene Canada, says the company is “pleased to be playing an important role in keeping Ontarians healthy” during the pandemic.

The government funding is through the Ontario Together Fund, which is geared towards targeted investments that increase the province’s stockpile of made-in-Ontario products and personal protective equipment.




© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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14Jan

Manitoba reports 2 more coronavirus deaths, 261 new cases Thursday – Winnipeg

by BBG Hub

Health officials say another two Manitobans have died from COVID-19 and 261 more have been infected as case numbers swell in the north.

The latest cases announced on the province’s online COVID-19 portal Thursday bring the province’s total number of cases reported since March to 26,954 after health officials say two previously announced cases were removed due to a data correction.

Read more:
Manitoba reports 158 new coronavirus cases, 5 additional deaths

Since March, 755 Manitobans have died from COVID-19.

The latest victims in include a man in his 60s from the Winnipeg Health region and a man in his 90s from the Prairie Mountain Health region connected to an outbreak at the McCreary/Alonsa Health Centre.

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Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Manitoba reports 158 new cases, 5 additional deaths'







Coronavirus: Manitoba reports 158 new cases, 5 additional deaths


Coronavirus: Manitoba reports 158 new cases, 5 additional deaths

More than half of the new infections reported Thursday — 139 — were identified in the Northern Health region, health officials said.

Manitoba’s acting deputy chief provincial public health officer, Dr. Jazz Atwal said the spike in cases in northern Manitoba are in part due to people getting together despite public health orders banning members of different households from gathering.

“Some of these are cases and contacts in larger household where maybe one person while they were symptomatic went into another household to visit, and had some spread,” he said during a call with media Thursday.

“I’m not saying all cases are related to that, but there is some evidence of that.”

Read more:
Coronavirus rapid testing site opening for Manitoba school staff

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Atwal says cases are climbing in Lynn Lake, Garden Hill First Nation, and Thompson.

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The other new cases include 75 in the Winnipeg Health region, 13 in the Southern Health region, 23 in the Prairie Mountain Health region, and 11 cases in the Interlake-Eastern Health region.

The province announced Thursday it will now be using text messaging to support COVID-19 case and contact monitoring, in addition to phone calls from contact tracers and automated phone messages.


Click to play video 'Answering your COVID-19 questions, Jan. 14'







Answering your COVID-19 questions, Jan. 14


Answering your COVID-19 questions, Jan. 14

“Text messages for monitoring will be used in combination with support for members of the Manitoba government’s contact tracing team throughout the isolation period,” Atwal said.

“It will provide recipients with an opportunity to confirm their isolation status, report changes and their symptoms, and request direct contact from a contact tracer.”

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Read more:
Manitoba expands vaccine distribution to fight COVID 19 as cases remain low

According to the province there are currently 117 people in hospital with COVID-19 as well as 173 who remain in care but are no longer considered active cases, for a total of 289 hospitalizations as of Thursday morning.

There are 16 COVID-19 patients in ICU, with another 21 who are no longer infectious but continue to need critical care, for a total of 37 patients in ICU.

The province says a new outbreak has been declared at Rock Lake Hospital in Crystal City, but the outbreak is declared over at Gilbert Plains Personal Care Home in Gilbert Plains.

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The five-day COVID-19 test positivity rate was 10 per cent provincially and 7.1 per cent in Winnipeg as of Friday morning.

Health officials say 2,333 tests for novel coronavirus were done Wednesday, bringing the total number of tests done across the province since February to 446,018.

Read more:
Manitoba students going back to school Monday, says province

There were 2,866 active cases of COVID-19 across Manitoba on Thursday, according to provincial data, but Atwal said the number of active cases is likely closer to 1,394 due to a backlog in case monitoring.

Manitoba announced 155 new cases and five additional deaths from the virus on Wednesday.

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Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.





© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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7Jan

Health Matters: Alberta man loses 100 lbs and designs weight tracking app

by BBG Hub


Health Matters January 7: If you’re waiting for surgery in the Edmonton area, you may soon get an automated call from AHS. And an Edmonton man managed to lose 100 pounds — and keep it off — by using his engineering knowledge. Su-Ling Goh reports.


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28Dec

The return of home workouts

by BBG Hub



The fitness industry was hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic and restrictions forced many fitness centres to shut down and Canadians found other ways to work out. So what does this mean for the future of the fitness industry? Global’s Sharmeen Somani breaks it down for us.


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14Dec

Winnipeg coronavirus vaccination clinic ready for first doses Wednesday, province says – Winnipeg

by BBG Hub

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister toured Winnipeg’s first COVID-19 vaccination clinic Monday as the province gets ready to deliver its first doses this week.

Last week, health officials announced Manitoba would begin receiving 900 doses of the vaccine this week, and Monday Pallister said a  priority group of health-care workers would be the first to get the vaccine starting Wednesday morning.

Read more:
Canada begins coronavirus vaccine rollout. Here are the provinces’ plans

“We want to express our gratitude for those workers for stepping up to protect themselves, their patients and their fellow Manitobans as we begin our immunization campaign,” the premier said in a statement following his tour.

“Our COVID-19 Vaccine Implementation Task Force have been working diligently to ensure our immunization roll out is as safe and effective as possible to protect Manitobans most at risk of this deadly virus.

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Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Manitoba’s top doctor provides update on COVID-19 vaccine booking'







Coronavirus: Manitoba’s top doctor provides update on COVID-19 vaccine booking


Coronavirus: Manitoba’s top doctor provides update on COVID-19 vaccine booking

“The clinic has been set up in a safe and efficient manner, using updated technology for screening clients and data surveillance.”

Set up at a Winnipeg hospital, the clinic will have seven immunizers on staff to start, each able to give out six shots per hour, the province says.

Read more:
Manitoba reports 241 new coronavirus cases, 9 additional deaths Monday

Manitoba’s chief public health officer, Dr. Brent Roussin, said health officials will be monitoring the first clinic closely to work out any kinks.

“This gives us the opportunity for receiving the vaccine, storing the vaccine, having the logistics of the clinic itself,” he explained at a Monday press conference, adding the province is planning to have bigger clinics as more vaccine becomes available.

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Media were given a tour of the lab where the first COVID-19 vaccinations will be given out starting Wednesday.


Media were given a tour of the lab where the first COVID-19 vaccinations will be given out starting Wednesday.


Global News

The province started booking spots for eligible health-care workers to get the COVID-19 vaccinations by phone over the weekend.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

But Roussin said Monday the phone number got out to the general public, and more than 100,000 calls flooded in. Some people were dishonest in answering automated screening questions, and were later sent away by live operators in charge of booking appointments, Roussin said.

Read more:
Health-care workers frustrated by swamped coronavirus immunization booking system

By Monday afternoon, about two-thirds of the 900 estimated qualified workers had appointments. Roussin said the weekend deluge of calls would not cause a delay in vaccinations, but will be a learning experience for the next round of shots as more shipments arrive.

He said those eligible for the vaccine will need to go through multiple screening points even once they arrive at the vaccination clinic.

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After filling out a consent form, shots will be administered at a station equipped with a laptop where real-time data can be entered afterwards.

Then, those who’ve received the shots will be taken to a separate space with tables and chairs where they’ll wait for 15 to makes sure there are no side effects.

Read more:
Manitoba announces initial plan for COVID-19 vaccine rollout

The province says roughly 330 people can be vaccinated out of the clinic in a day.

Only Manitoba health-care workers whose work involves direct contact with patients are eligible for the first shots, and they must work in either critical, acute or long-term care settings.

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Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Roussin says winter holidays have to ‘be different,’ but COVID-19 vaccine offers hope'







Coronavirus: Roussin says winter holidays have to ‘be different,’ but COVID-19 vaccine offers hope


Coronavirus: Roussin says winter holidays have to ‘be different,’ but COVID-19 vaccine offers hope

There are also age requirements: candidates must be 50 or older by Dec. 31 if you work in critical care, or 60 or older if you work in either acute care or long-term care.

People who will be working in the COVID-19 immunization clinics are also eligible, the province has said.

Canada’s first batch of coronavirus vaccine doses arrived in the country Sunday, and the first vaccinations were doled out in Quebec and Ontario Monday morning.

Read more:
Canada’s 1st batch of coronavirus vaccines have arrived, Trudeau says

The Pfizer vaccine is the only COVID-19 vaccine approved in Canada so far.

The federal government has said just under 250,000 doses will arrive by the end of the year, which would mean a big boost in the supply arriving in the last week of December.

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— With files from Kevin Hirschfield and The Canadian Press

Questions about COVID-19? Here are some things you need to know:

Symptoms can include fever, cough and difficulty breathing — very similar to a cold or flu. Some people can develop a more severe illness. People most at risk of this include older adults and people with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease. If you develop symptoms, contact public health authorities.

To prevent the virus from spreading, experts recommend frequent handwashing and coughing into your sleeve. They also recommend minimizing contact with others, staying home as much as possible and maintaining a distance of two metres from other people if you go out. In situations where you can’t keep a safe distance from others, public health officials recommend the use of a non-medical face mask or covering to prevent spreading the respiratory droplets that can carry the virus. In some provinces and municipalities across the country, masks or face coverings are now mandatory in indoor public spaces.

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For full COVID-19 coverage from Global News, click here.





© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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