Category "Day Break"

14Mar

‘Depression isn’t like a broken bone’: Steps to overcome this common mental illness – National

by BBG Hub


Depression can slowly takeover a person’s routine, often making it difficult to go to work or even get out of bed.

A clinical state of depression can be intense, making it hard for some to balance their relationships or social life, often making them feel worthless, weak or sometimes suicidal, said Toronto clinical psychologist Dr. Maneet Bhatia.

But there are others with mild symptoms of the mental health illness: they may be “high-functioning” on the outside, but carry the burdens of feeling depressed from time-to-time.

READ MORE: 8 signs your child may be going through depression

“Mental health doesn’t exist in a vacuum, we have to live in a world where we have to continously think about it,” he told Global News. “Feeling depressed and being clinically depressed are two different (but common) things.”

Is there really a ‘cure?’

Bhatia said when people are diagnosed with depression, most healthcare professionals will set up a plan to overcome it. It’s different for everyone, he added, and many people go into it thinking depression can be a lifelong battle.

“Cure is a medical word, but mental health and depression isn’t like a broken bone,” he continued, adding that there are ways to “cure” your symptoms, but it doesn’t mean you are cured forever.

“Cure implies it is black and white and it’s not always the case,” he said. “You can manage it and overcome it, but it still means you have to take care of it.”

Steps to overcome depression

In a post for Psychology Today, psychotherapist Linda Esposito said if you want to overcome depression, you need to resist the urge to live in the past. “Time spent reliving, rewriting and recreating the past is like purchasing a one-way ticket to the dark depths of despair,” she wrote.

“This insidious mental habit is as much a threat to emotional well-being as any. Self-loathing or blaming others will not get you on the right side of feeling better, any more than believing the answer is found at the bottom of a bottle of Jack Daniels.

“You cannot do life differently if you don’t change your thought process.”

Dr. Jane Framingham, in article for PsychCentral, added that overcoming depression requires taking baby steps. “If you feel good one day, and decide to try and start a new business or make a new friend and you fail, it could be a forceful setback in overcoming depression,” she wrote in October 2018.  “Instead, try things out slowly, and experiment with change one step at a time.”

READ MORE: CMHA offering program to help people battling anxiety or depression

She also noted that not all paths to overcome depression are a straight line. “There will be setbacks in your journey recovering from depression, no matter if you focus on going it alone (e.g., without seeking formal treatment), or even if you are in treatment with an antidepressant or psychotherapy,” she continued.

“Take the setbacks in stride, though, and keep them in perspective — it wouldn’t be work if it was simple to recover from depression. Depression recovery is a process that will take time, but as long as you stick with the goal of change, you can overcome depression in due time.”

Here are some other tips Bhatia recommended:

Recognize the signs: Signs of depression in children and adults can include irritable moods, feeling of guilt or worthlessness, losing interest in things over time or trouble concentrating. Other symptoms of depression, Bhatia added, include loss of appetite, change in sleeping habits or isolation.

Reach out to your support network: Once you recognize the signs, reach out to a mental health professional and your close family and friends. Bhatia said this allows people in your network to check in on you and also allows you to update them.

Find the treatment that works for you: This one will vary depending on the person, but once your healthcare provider recommends a treatment option (medicine, mindfulness, therapy or all of the above), take this treatment seriously.

READ MORE: Depression leads to shorter lifespan — Canadian study

Try lifestyle changes: Sometimes managing or overcoming depression means making lifestyle changes. This includes eating healthier, getting more sleep, staying active or even picking up a hobby.

Be mindful of your thinking patterns: One of the biggest ways to advocate for your own health is to be mindful of how you feel, he added. This can be achieved through therapy, but sometimes this means keeping track of your day-to-day and seeing how your treatments or therapy are working for you.

Where to get help

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs help, resources are available. In case of an emergency, please call 911 for immediate help.

The Canadian Association for Suicide PreventionDepression Hurts and Kids Help Phone 1-800-668-6868  all offer ways of getting help if you, or someone you know, may be suffering from mental health issues.

[email protected]

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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26Feb

Trouble speaking up at work? How to overcome this common fear – National

by BBG Hub


Leading a meeting or presenting a deck are common workplace practices, but for some people, it is incredibly difficult to speak up at work.

Dr. Laurie Helgoe, author of Introvert Power: Why Your Inner Life Is Your Hidden Strength and associate professor of behavioural sciences at the Ross University School of Medicine in Barbados, said this fear happens for a variety of reasons.

“Shy people, for example, are reluctant to speak out in public because they are uncomfortable being the focus of attention,” she told Global News.

“Socially anxious individuals worry about suffering embarrassment or humiliation,” she explained. “Introverts, by contrast, like to work out their thoughts privately before sharing them.”

READ MORE: Asking for a raise, networking and culture — an introvert’s guide to the workplace

She added that in rooms where ideas are flying back and forth, the pressure to respond quickly or on the spot can add even more pressure.

And once people are known in the office for not speaking up or contributing to larger projects, employees may be reluctant to ask for their advice at all.

“This can be a self-fulfilling prophecy: you don’t expect the quiet person to speak so you keep talking, which ensures that he or she will not speak,” she continued.

“Introverts do not like to interrupt, but they often have ideas they want to share. Simply asking a quiet person how he or she prefers to provide input can solve the mystery.”

Helgoe said some people prefer to be invited to speak, some prefer to share their ideas in writing, and some just need some time to prepare their thoughts.

When your fear turns into a larger problem

Some, like experts at job-hunting site Monster, added the fear of speaking up, in general, could even cost an employee their job.

One DecisionWise Benchmark study found when employees don’t speak up, it can lead to non-productive habits, reduced performance and turnovers and a higher chance of being absent.

“There are four very common fears that stand in the way of you speaking up, especially as a new hire,” author Jon Simmons added.

READ MORE: 5 simple ways to manage your daily anxiety

Some believe they are too new to have their opinion count at the workplace, while others are never too sure if they are 100 per cent right.

“It doesn’t matter if you’re not an expert on the material or subject of the meeting. Of course, you should come prepared for the meeting with a few thoughts and talking points, but don’t get discouraged from sharing your opinion in the future if you’re wrong about something.”

Glenn Llopis explained in Forbes, unless you speak up, you can’t fully thrive at work. 

“There is a reason that certain people advance more quickly than others in their careers,” he wrote. “They have mastered the art of speaking up by having a balanced voice that their colleagues respect and admire.”

How to be more confident

But this is easier said than done. Getting over the fear of public speaking doesn’t happen overnight, but Helgoe said there are ways to slowly conquer this fear.

For starters, be prepared. “For introverts, the preparation they enjoy is what can build confidence and ensure success. Avoidance is the biggest trap because it blocks preparation.”

Do the research, practice your delivery and talk through your ideas with someone you trust. “People forget how helpful preparation can be for informal interactions. If you learn more about the people you are going to meet at a work reception, for example, you will be able to enter conversations with curiosity and context.”

READ MORE: Parents who miss work to help children suffering from anxiety cost Ontario economy $421M a year

Seek other ways to improve public speaking — most major cities have Toastmasters groups for example, or similar workshops that help people develop these skills. Some companies even have courses employees can take during work hours.

“Discover how much fun it can be to present in a low-stakes, high-support setting while honing your skills for a variety of speaking scenarios.”

For those days when you do feel extra nervous or not confident, remember that it happens to most people.

“Remember that most people are anxious about speaking in public, so go easy on yourself.”

[email protected]

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.




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